Kipchoge shatters own marathon world record in Berlin

Kipchoge shatters own marathon world record in Berlin
Eliud Kipchoge celebrates his world record win in Berlin

The 37-year-old, who has now won 15 of his 17 career marathons, including two Olympic triumphs and 10 major titles, was in a class of his own, setting a blistering pace along the flat, fast inner-city course from the start on an overcast day.

Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge shattered his own marathon world record on Sunday, winning the Berlin race with a time of 2:01.09, some 30 seconds faster than his previous world best set in the German capital four years ago.

The 37-year-old, who has now won 15 of his 17 career marathons, including two Olympic triumphs and 10 major titles, was in a class of his own, setting a blistering pace along the flat, fast inner-city course from the start on an overcast day.

Just when it seemed Kipchoge had achieved everything he possibly could over the classic distance, the legendary pushed the world record further out of reach for the rest of the distance-running world.

Unlike his last world record run, the double Olympic champion went out hard on this occasion, passing through 5km in 14:14 and 10km in 28:22 – not just comfortably inside world record pace, but also well inside a projected two-hour finish.

Kipchoge maintained that pace through half way, which was reached in 59:50, but his pace started to drop slightly from then on, and by 25km (1:11:08) his projected finish had slipped to just outside two hours – still more than a minute inside world record pace, though.

Ethiopia’s Andamlak Belihu was just about staying level with Kipchoge up until this point, but the Kenyan superstar then gradually pulled clear and was out on his own.

He passed through 30km in 1:25:40, then reached 35km in 1:40:10. By the time he passed through 40km in 1:54:53, his lead had grown to move than four minutes with Mark Korir having moved into second place.

His victory – and world record – nor a formality, Kipchoge went on to cross the line in 2:01:09, taking 30 seconds off the world record he set in the German capital four years ago. Korir held on to second place in 2:05:58 and Ethiopia’s Tadu Abate came through to finish third in 2:06:28.

1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN)2:01:09

2. Mark Korir (KEN)2:05:58

3. Tadu Abate (ETH)2:06:28

4. Andamlak Belihu (ETH)2:06:40

5. Abel Kipchumba (KEN)2:06:49

6. Limenih Getachew (ETH)2:07:07